Immerse, Public Art Tour

September 2, 2020

Follow this Driving Route for a Curated Tour of Outdoor Public Art in South Scottsdale

The Bell, The Flower and The Wash by Ilan Averbuch. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Although Scottsdale Arts facilities remain closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, outdoor public art is still an accessible and safe (when proper social distancing measures are followed) way to experience creativity and beauty. With that in mind, we’ve organized three driving tours of outdoor public art in Scottsdale, separated into three regions: north, central, and south.

You can find the previously published routes here for north Scottsdale and central Scottsdale. This week we continue with a south Scottsdale route, primarily including artworks located south of Camelback Road, though some close to Camelback were previously included in the central route.

While the list below does not include all of the artworks in this region, it does feature most of the pieces that can be seen from the road or those located outside that can safely be viewed up close while social distancing and wearing masks or cloth face coverings.

This tour has been arranged in a semi-spiral route. For an interactive map of the all the public art in Scottsdale, visit ScottsdalePublicArt.org and scroll down to the map. The map does not show this exact route, but it can be used as a guide or for creating your own tour. It also includes clickable icons that will take you to informational pages about each of the public artworks, though each of those links is also available below.

Starting point: Intersection of Camelback Road and Scottsdale Road. From this intersection, you’ll pass two artworks included on the central route, The Doors on west side of the road and Copper Falls on the east side. As you drive south on Scottsdale Road and cross the Arizona Canal, you’ll see Soleri Bridge and Plaza on the west (right) side of the road. To view this artwork and others along the canal up close, turn west (right) on Stetson Drive and look for a parking spot along Stetson or 5th Avenue. Approximate destination address: 4420 N. Scottsdale Road or park near the intersection of Stetson Drive and 5th Avenue.

Soleri Bridge and Plaza by Paolo Soleri. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Soleri Bridge and Plaza by Paolo Soleri — The infamous architect Paolo Soleri, who lived in nearby Paradise Valley, designed many bridges throughout his career. Soleri Bridge and Plaza was the only one ever built, and it also doubles as a solar calendar. Make sure to also look for examples of his cast earth artwork on the monolithic panels at either end of the bridge. Learn more.

Walking directions: If you parked near Soleri Bridge instead of just driving past, make sure to walk around the smaller set of pylons, directly south of the tall pylons. Nestled up inside you’ll find Goldwater Bell. Approximate destination address: 4420 N. Scottsdale Road.

Goldwater Bell by Paolo Soleri. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Goldwater Bell by Paolo Soleri — The architect’s bell designs are still cast and sold today, but Soleri himself cast this bell in 1969. It takes its name from its former location, the old Goldwater Store in Scottsdale. Learn more.

Walking directions: At the east side of Soleri Plaza, near Scottsdale Road, you’ll find one of the eight Traceries recycle bins. Approximate destination address: 4420 N. Scottsdale Road.

Traceries by Mary Bates Neubauer. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Traceries by Mary Bates Neubauer — This series of artist-designed recycle and trash bins is the newest addition to the city’s permanent public art collection (as of May 2020). It’s seven companions, all featuring different color schemes and varying designs, can be found along the south bank of the Arizona Canal, spread out for about 1/3 of a mile to the west with two of them located on the plaza between Marshall Way Bridge and Stetson Drive. Learn more.

Driving directions: If you didn’t stop to see the artworks along the canal on foot, you’ll still want to turn southwest (right) at Stetson Drive and follow it as it curves south toward 5th Avenue. Turn west (right again) onto 5th Avenue and proceed to the roundabout at the intersection with Marshall Way, where you’ll find Bronze Horse Fountain. Destination address: Intersection of Marshall Way and 5th Avenue.

Bronze Horse Fountain by Bob Parks. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Bronze Horse Fountain by Bob Parks — This fountain, donated by the artist in 1989 to help attract visitors to nearby art galleries, shops, and restaurants, features five Arabian horses, speaking to Scottsdale’s important place in the U.S. Arabian horse market. Learn more.

Driving directions: At the roundabout, turn south onto Marshall Way and follow it until the intersection with Indian School Road. Park on Marshall Way just before you arrive at Indian School Road in order to view One-Eyed Jack and Horseshoe Falls. Destination address: 7042 E. Indian School Road.

One-Eyed Jack by John Randall Nelson. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

One-Eyed Jack by John Randall Nelson — This towering white bunny had a difficult birth, but it is now one of the newer additions to the city’s permanent public art collection. Like Bronze Horse Fountain, this 26-foot steel sculpture was designed to draw attention to the surrounding Scottsdale Arts District. Learn more.

Walking directions: Kitty-corner from One-Eyed Jack you’ll find Horseshoe Falls, so if you stop to get out and look at Jack, just take a few more minutes to cross the two roads because Horseshoe Falls is best experienced up close. Destination address: Southeast corner of Indian School Road and Marshall Way.

Horseshoe Falls by Michael Maglich. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Horseshoe Falls by Michael Maglich — There are a lot of horses depicted in public art throughout the city, but this one is all about their shoes. The iconic shape is repeated throughout the piece, and the towers are made from stacked horseshoes. A mist can be initiated by visitors, but we caution them to wear gloves or use hand sanitizer after pushing the button. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue south on Marshall Way to the roundabout at the intersection with Main Street, where you’ll find Jack Knife. Destination address: Intersection of Marshall Way and Main Street.

Jack Knife by Ed Mell. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Jack Knife by Ed Mell — Modeled after the Scottsdale’s official city seal, Mell gave the piece—his first large-scale sculpture—a contemporary take on a more traditional subject. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue south on Main Street—past Western Spirit: Scottsdale’s Museum of the West—to 2nd Street and turn west (right). Turn north, right, into the parking lot just before the Stagebrush Theatre and drive toward the back of the lot to view Diamond Bloom, on display near the southwest corner of Western Spirit. Approximate destination address: 7020 E. 2nd Street.

Diamond Bloom by Curtis Pittman. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Diamond Bloom by Curtis Pittman — Beautiful during the day or night, this elegant sculpture incorporates brass panels, dichroic glass, and lights for a luminous colorplay. Learn more.

Driving directions: Return to the road, turning east (left) onto 2nd Street. Look to the south (right) to see Ziggy’s Sister in front of Scottsdale Artist’s School, then turn south (right) onto Marshall Way. After passing the school, turn west (right) into the parking lot behind the school, and then north (right again) to drive up along the back side of the school, where you can view Vintage. For a closer look at both sculptures, park in the lot and walk up to them, making sure to safely distance from anyone not in your household. Destination address: 3720 N. Marshall Way.

Ziggy’s Sister by Al Beadle. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Ziggy’s Sister by Al Beadle — Designed by one of the Valley’s most prominent architects and artists, this sculpture was fabricated about 20 years ago but only recently donated to the city in honor of the Beadle family. Beadle’s architectural projects typically came with one of his sculptures. Ziggy’s Sister is one of only two sculptures that he painted blue. Learn more.

Vintage by Patricia Stillman. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Vintage by Patricia Stillman — The life-size bronze nude was donated to city’s collection by the artist. Learn more.

Driving directions: Exit the Artists’ School parking lot from the north, turning east (right) onto 2nd Street. Continue east toward Drinkwater Boulevard. (As you pass Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA) on the north side of the street, note Glass Scrim Wall on the building’s southeast corner. The route will end at Scottsdale Civic Center for a chance to explore artworks like this elegant structure on foot.) Turn south (right) onto Drinkwater Boulevard and watch for Scottsdale Stadium and the Homeplates public art installation on the east (left) side of the road. To see it up close, turn east (left) into the large parking structure before you arrive at the stadium. Then walk to the stadium. Destination address: 7408 E. Osborn Road (Parking garage address: 3803 N. Drinkwater Boulevard).

Homeplates by Craig Smith and Dan Collins. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Homeplates by Craig Smith and Dan Collins — This installation features three elements, a series of large black and white photographs of historic baseball equipment, a series of arcade frieze designs built into the stadium itself, and a symbolic pitcher’s mound made of bricks with a 60-foot-long bronze strip leading to a home plate. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue south on Drinkwater Boulevard. As the road begins to curve to the west (right), turn left instead to continue south on Civic Center Plaza (74th Street). On the southeast corner of this intersection you’ll find Hummingbird Sanctuary. Approximate destination address: 3333 N. Civic Center Plaza.

Hummingbird Sanctuary by Kevin Berry. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Hummingbird Sanctuary by Kevin Berry — With four public artwork collections in south Scottsdale—including Tributary Wall and two different designs for bus stops—Berry’s signature stone and steel work has helped define the character of Old Town. However, much of his artistry for Hummingbird Sanctuary, including the stylized trumpet vine shapes of his steel pinnacles, is now purposely hidden beneath actual trumpet vines, creating the namesake sanctuary. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue south on Civic Center Plaza (74th Street) to the intersection with Thomas Road. Turn west (right) on Thomas Road and follow it to Scottsdale Road, where you will turn south (left). Follow Scottsdale Road south to the intersection with Oak Street. #bluewing is located on the northeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Oak Street. To view it up close, look for nearby public parking. Destination address: 2301 N. Scottsdale Road.

#bluewing by Cherie Buck-Hutchison and Curtis Hutchison. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

#bluewing by Cherie Buck-Hutchison and Curtis Hutchison — As one of this year’s IN FLUX artworks, #bluewing is only temporarily in this location, but you won’t want to miss the gorgeous reflections in this wing-shaped tile mosaic, inspired by birds both natural and mythical. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue south on Scottsdale Road to the intersection with Roosevelt Street. Meditation on Fragmented Space is located on the northeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Roosevelt Street. To view it up close, look for nearby public parking. Destination address: 1005 N. Scottsdale Road.

Meditation on Fragmented Space by Daniel Mariotti. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Meditation on Fragmented Space by Daniel Mariotti — This abstract sculpture is another addition to this year’s IN FLUX Cycle 9, which is schedule to remain on display through spring 2021. A cast bronze piece, it features a buried earth patina that will show through over time. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue south on Scottsdale Road, then turn east (left) on McKellips Road. Follow McKellips east to the city’s District 1 police station and turn south (right) into the parking lot. Destination address: 7601 E. McKellips Road.

Garden of Evidence by Dennis Oppenheim. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Garden of Evidence by Dennis Oppenheim — The entire artwork comprises sculpture, ceramic tiles, and landscape elements distributed throughout the entry plaza of Scottsdale’s District 1 police station and crime laboratory. It most prominently includes six large, architectural prickly pear cactus forms. Learn more.

Driving directions: Turn east (right) from the police station parking lot onto McKellips Road. Turn north (left) on Hayden Road and follow it north to the intersection with McDowell Road. Turn east (right) on McDowell Road and then north (left) on Granite Reef Road. Then turn west (left) into the parking lot of the Granite Reef Senior Center. Walk around the south side of the senior center to locate Quarter Ring Progression. It cannot be seen from the parking lot. Destination address: 1700 North Granite Reef Road.

Quarter Ring Progression by Michael Anderson. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Quarter Ring Progression by Michael Anderson — One of the more striking works in the collection, Quarter Ring Progression is an abstract steel sculpture comprising a series of overlapping, quarter-ring arcs. Learn more.

Driving directions: Turn south (right) from the parking lot, back onto Granite Reef Road, and follow it south to return to McDowell Road. Turn west (right) onto McDowell Road and then north (right, again) onto Miller Road. Drive north on Miller Road and look for The Bell, The Flower and The Wash in Eldorado Park on east side of the road. Destination address: 1901 N. Miller Road.

The Bell, The Flower and The Wash by Ilan Averbuch. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

The Bell, The Flower and The Wash by Ilan Averbuch — The most noticeable aspect of this artwork is the presence of two massive steel funnels, one upright and the other on its side. They can easily be viewed from the road while driving past, but if you want to stop for a closer inspection, you’ll find the stone trough, which is filled with rainwater by a hidden pipe connected to the standing funnel. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue north on Miller Road, then turn east (right) on Thomas Road. Follow Thomas Road east to the bridge crossing Indian Bend Wash, where you’ll see Swale rising up on both sides of the bridge. If you want to stop and view the art from the wash below, use the parking lot on the south side of Thomas, directly west of the bridge. Approximate destination address: 7825 E. Thomas Road (parking lot at 7801 E. Thomas Road).

Swale by Stacy Levy. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Swale by Stacy Levy — The colorful tendrils rising up on both sides of the bridge are 176 powder-coated steel “blades” and “seed pods” evoking the vegetation that grows along the wash. The blue blades symbolize the ephemeral streams that run through the wash during heavy rains. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue east on Thomas, then turn north (left) onto Hayden Road. Drive north on Hayden, and turn east (right) on Indian School Road. Right after Granite Reef Road, turn south (right) into the parking lot of a Scottsdale Police station. Destination address: 8401 E. Indian School Road.

To Serve and Protect by Jeff Carol Davenport. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

To Serve and Protect by Jeff Carol Davenport — This community-initiated bronze sculpture of a police officer with a child was the idea of Officer Ron Gorski, who raised the funds to commission it. Arizona Bronze in Tempe also donated foundry services. Learn more.

Driving directions: Since you cannot turn west (left) from the police station parking lot, turn east (right) onto Scottsdale Road, then look for an opportunity to make a legal U-turn to begin heading west. Once you are going in the correct direction, begin looking for the distinctively white Flower Pauses benches along Indian School Road. The route will take you to two of them in a couple of stops. For the next artwork, turn north (right) into Miller Plaza, the commercial complex anchored by a Fry’s Food and Drug, located just east of Miller Road. Park at the north side of the lot, near Orangetheory Fitness. Destination address: 7620 E. Indian School Road.

From left (in the background), Secondary Effusion, To Atone, and Stored Echoes, all by John David Yanke. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Secondary Effusion, Stored Echoes, and To Atone by John David Yanke — This trio of temporary, colorful sculptures is also part of the IN FLUX Cycle 9 series. Secondary Effusion and Stored Echoes are made from upcycled bedsprings while Yanke used plywood to craft To Atone. Learn More.

Driving directions: From the parking lot, turn east (right) onto Indian School Road and follow it to the intersection with 75th Street. Then turn north (right) onto 75th Street, and make another immediate right-turn (east) into the parking lot for the city’s Community Design Studio, housed in an old church. Walk around to the sidewalk in front of the building to view two Flower Pauses benches. Destination address: 7506 E. Indian School Road.

Flower Pauses by Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt.

Flower Pauses by Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt — These stylized seating nodes along Indian School Road are designed as park-like open home vignettes, pairing white garden benches with a patterned “floor.” Learn more.

Driving directions: Turn south (left) from the parking lot and continue south on 75th Street past Windows to the West (we’ll return at the end of the route) at the Civic Center to reach the Scottsdale Justice Center. Destination address: 3700 N. 75th Street.

Scottsdale Justice Center by Jack Mackie. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Scottsdale Justice Center by Jack Mackie — The artist worked with the architectural design team to implement a variety of gavel designs on the building’s façade and the seating areas around the entrance. The half-gavel benches are engraved with quotes about justice. Learn more. Learn more.

Driving directions: Continue south on 75th Street just past the Scottsdale Justice Center to a cul de sac on the north end of Scottsdale Stadium. Spirit of Volunteerism is located just south of the cul-de-sac. Approximate destination address: Slightly south of 3700 N. 75th Street.

Spirit of Volunteerism by Gerry Metz. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Spirit of Volunteerism by Gerry Metz — Spirit of Volunteerism is a bronze memorial to the late Jim Hill, a leader of spring training volunteers known as “The Commissioner.” For more than 20 years, he recruited and managed 150 volunteers each season to help raise charitable funds for local youth projects. Learn more.

Driving directions: If you’re not tired yet, return north along 75th Way to the Scottsdale Civic Center area (sometimes called the Civic Center Mall or Civic Center Park) and park near the library. In addition to the Civic Center Library, Scottsdale City Hall, Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, and SMoCA, the Civic Center is also home to more than 20 public artworks. A future blog post may have details for a walking tour of the artworks at the Civic Center, but for the purposes of this route, we’ll just include one prominent piece easily visible from 75th Street: Windows to the West. Approximate destination address: Intersection of 75th Street and 1st Street.

Windows to the West by Louise Nevelson. Photo: Scottsdale Arts.

Windows to the West by Louise Nevelson — One of America’s leading sculptors of the 20th century, the late Nevelson was commissioned to create this abstract piece, officially titled Atmosphere and Environments XVIII, through a matching grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. It became Nevelson’s first large work in the Southwest. Learn more.


Previous Driving Tour Routes:
North Scottsdale
Central Scottsdale


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